Cherry MX switches are among the best mechanical key switches in the consumer market. For the average person who does not know much about them, mechanical keyboard switches are complex structures that allow you to type on a mechanical keyboard. Laptops that most people commonly use have a rubber membrane underneath their keycaps that registers the strokes. 

Cherry MX switch comparison

However, mechanical key switches offer a completely different typing experience. Keys that use mechanical switches have more travel and offer tactile feedback, so you don’t need to press them all the way through to register a keystroke. Tactility is one of the biggest advantages of these switches, which are adored by typists and gamers since they make typing easier on your fingers! Custom keyboard enthusiasts particularly love the unique sounds that accompany mechanical switches. 

In this article, we will provide our readers with a comprehensive Cherry MX switches comparison, discussing the different switches the company manufactures as well as their distinct categories. Consequently, we will be discussing four popular categories, namely Cherry MX clicky, linear, tactile, and specialty switches. So, grab yourself a cushion or find a comfortable place to sit down because this will be a good, long read. Let’s begin.

Switch Background: What Are Cherry MX Switches?

Cherry is one of the biggest names in computer input and peripheral devices. Walter Cherry founded it in 1953 in the United States. Headquartered in Germany, the company has been producing keyboards since 1973. 

Cherry is most popular for its MX and ML keyboard switches range, such as the cherry MX blue quiet or cherry MX green. It’s the first company that introduced the color-coding method of categorizing key switches, which is used as the gold standard today. Cherry MX switches have even been used in industrial electronics and consumer PC keyboards produced by giants like Corsair. 

Cherry MX switches were patented in the early ’80s and rose to prominence after ’85. Since their golden days, they’d adopted a system of referring to specific switches by the color of their stem. Many companies like Razer even adopted this method as it was versatile yet extremely effective. 

Cherry has developed several specialized key switch lines with specific capabilities for years. The company produces all types of mechanical keyboard switches, from silent ones to clicky and tactile ones. The Cherry MX Silent switches are particularly popular with custom keyboard enthusiasts and master typists who do not like the audible feedback of other switch types.

If mechanical keyboards are not entirely unknown to you, you might have heard about the Cherry MX Browns. These are perhaps the most well-known Cherry MX switches in the history of keyboard switches. We will read more about them later on in the review. For now, it’s enough to mention that the MX Browns were specifically created at the request of the owner of Kinesis, a famous keyboard manufacturing company., who was a big fan of Cherry MX switches.

Components of a Cherry MX Switch

Before we get into the nitty-gritty of Cherry’s extensive line-up of mechanical keyboard switches, let’s develop a general understanding of the different components of a Cherry MX switch. Don’t worry if you’re a beginner who recently opened your eyes to the world of keyboards; we aim to provide a comprehensive review of Cherry switches so that it’s understandable to the average reader. Cherry MX switches have four main components, upper housing, stem, spring, and lower housing.

Components of a Cherry MX Switch
Components of a Cherry MX Switch

Upper Housing 

The upper housing refers to the visible external covering of the keyboard switch. The outer covering houses all the switch components and protects the parts from dust and grease, keeping them clean. The other function of the upper housing is to guide the colored stem to the crosspoint contact. When you press a key on your mechanical keyboard, it hits the upper housing, which secures all other parts of the switch and guides in actuating the keystroke.

Stem

The stem is the colored long plastic stick that protrudes from underneath the keycap. The colored cross-shaped protrusion is characteristic of Cherry MX switches. The stem is responsible for the actual actuation of the key and is guided by the upper housing component. The stem’s length, shape, and build regulate the keystroke feel and determine the switch type.

Spring

The spring, also called the coil spring, is a mechanical structure located at the bottom of the Cherry MX switches. It is responsible for providing the pressure one feels when pressing the keycap. The coil spring can be made taught or loose, and its rigidity helps determine the pressure required during actuation. Since it is an elastic structure, the spring guides the key switch back to its original position after the actuation point.

Lower Housing

The lower, or base, housing serves a similar function as the upper housing. It neatly secures the switch components, holding them all together, and provides a base for the upper housing. The bottom surface of the base housing provides an attachment point to the printed circuit board (PCB) and guides the crosspoint contact to connect to the circuit.

Characteristics of a Cherry MX Switch

Operation Style

Note for Client: We can’t find anything on google regarding operating style. We also used the “find” function on the web pages for the links you provided, but they did not have the term either. 

Operating Force

The operating force, or actuation force, is the force required for a keystroke to be registered by the keyboard. It is typically measured in centinewtons or gram-force. 

Actuation Point

The actuation point is also measured in millimeters, but it is markedly different from the total travel difference. At the beginning of this article, we mentioned that mechanical key switches quickly actuate, so you don’t have to press keycaps down; this is essentially the actuation point. The actuation point, also called the activation point, is the distance at which the key actuates, and the keystroke gets registered by the keyboard.

Total Travel Distance

The total travel distance is the length traveled from the top of the key when it is unpressed to the bottom of the key when fully pressed. It is a measure of the distance it takes for a key to bottom out fully. The total travel distance is measured in millimeters.

Life Span (Keystrokes)

Lifespan refers to the longevity of mechanical switches. Their life cycle is based on the number of keystrokes the switches can register before deviating from factory conditions. Mechanical key switches tend to last for 10 to 15 years, and their lifespan is stated in “n million keystrokes.” For instance, Cherry MX switches are generally rated at 50-100 million keystrokes. However, most switches usually last longer than the stated lifetime, which is reason enough to invest in them.

Types of Switches

Keyboard switches
Mechanical keyboard switches

There are generally three main types of switches based on their actuation type. Knowing the switch type is important as you don’t want to buy a pack of key switches whose sound you don’t like when typing. 

Linear Switches

Linear switches don’t have any invasive feedback mechanism like pushback or loud tactile feedback. As a result, they’re considered the best switch type for gamers who want a smooth gaming experience. Linear switches operate extremely smoothly and provide a quiet, almost silent, clicking sound upon bottoming out!

Tactile Switches

Tactile switches are named after the tactile feedback they provide users. These are suitable for both typing and gaming activities. Tactile switches provide a distinctive bump when you press on a keycap. The bump isn’t silent, but it’s not uncomfortably loud either. Some people prefer tactile switches as they allow you to type faster and without the need to push the keycaps all the way down!

Clicky Switches

Clicky switches are the loudest among the three categories. They’re also great for typing since they provide clicky feedback, like tactile switches. However, it is important to mention that clicky switches are also unpopular with certain groups within the community who don’t like the loud clicking sound these switches make when they bottom out.

On the flip side, many love the additional auditory feedback they can get on every keystroke. While they’re a solid choice for home usage, it’s a really bad idea to take them to offices or public spaces, so beware!

Other Types of Switches 

The aforementioned switch types are not the only kinds of mechanical switches circulating in the consumer market. In fact, many companies like Cherry specialize in manufacturing several different types of switches. In addition to the main three switch types, Cherry MX switches are often categorized as quiet, speed, or optical.

Quiet

Quiet switches have perfected the silent feedback mechanism. They make very minimal noise and are commonly based on linear switches. Since they are naturally the quietest switch type, they can be supplemented with mods to enhance the silent feedback further. At the same time, many quiet switches are also available in tactile options.

Speed

Speed switches are a specialized switch type, perfect for avid gamers, particularly those who play FPS and RPGs. They’re designed for speed, so the travel distance for the stem is drastically reduced. A shorter travel distance allows for faster key switch presses, boosting your reaction time. 

Optical

Optical switches are another popular and techy switch type. They are designed to work with light. Infrared light and photoelectric switches are used to detect the keystrokes. When you press the key, the stem is pushed down, breaking the beam of light, which the keyboard registers as a press. 

Optical switches boast a far superior reaction time and a longer lifespan than the other switch types because there’s no wear or tear due to metal contact. They’re especially popular with custom keyboard enthusiasts.

Cherry MX Switches: A Comparison Table

ColorDescriptionUsage

MX Red

Smooth with light resistance. No bump, and relatively quiet.Gaming

MX Black

Smooth with heavy resistance. No bump, and relatively quiet.Gaming

MX Brown

Bumpy with medium resistance. Moderate sound level.Typing/Gaming

MX Clear

Bumpy with heavy resistance. Moderate sound level.

Typing/Gaming

MX BlueClicky and bumpy with medium resistance. Very loud.

Typing/Gaming

MX GreenClicky and bumpy with heavy resistance. Very loud.

Typing/Gaming

Once you’ve become an expert, you could view this brief chart for a quick Cherry MX switch comparison. Follow us down the rabbit hole for a comprehensive overview of all Cherry MX switches.

Cherry MX Clicky Switches

Cherry is one of the oldest companies ever to produce clicky switches. Clicky switches are extremely divisive within the mechanical keyboard community because many love them while others despise them.

Clicky switches are popular for the click-clack sound feedback they provide on every keystroke. Many love the additional auditory feedback, which can act as an aid for novice typists. However, most of the community does not like the loud noise, which becomes quite a hindrance during intense gaming sessions.

Cherry MX Blue

Cherry MX blue switches
Cherry MX blue switches
  • Type: Clicky
  • Feel/Sound: Bumpy and Loud
  • Actuation Force: 60g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 60g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX Blues are the most well-known clicky option. They’re very loud and produce a pronounced clicking sound on every keystroke. Additionally, they also have bumpy tactile feedback for those who don’t want to hit their keys all the way through. 

Some people like the bumpy feel as it helps them avoid making the constant clicking sound every time the switch bottoms out. Again, the Cherry MX Blue is loud and can distract players when they’re engrossed in competitive gameplay.

Cherry MX Green 

Cherry MX Green switches
Cherry MX Green switches
  • Type: Clicky
  • Feel/Sound: Bumpy and Loud
  • Actuation Force: 80g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 90g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX Green is another loud option in the clicky category. They produce a sound similar to that of the MX Blues, but they’re bumpier, with a heavier build. If you want to go back to the days of sturdy typewriters, this is the switch choice for you. 

With the Cherry MX Green, you can type with more pronounced touches without fear of damaging the key switch. These Cherry MX switches don’t need to bottom out since the total travel distance is 4mm while the actuation distance is half that value! However, this also makes them a bad choice for those who type lightly or don’t prefer loud auditory feedback.

Cherry MX White 

Cherry MX White switches
Cherry MX White switches
  • Type: Clicky
  • Feel/Sound: Bumpy and Moderately Loud
  • Actuation Force: 80g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 90g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX White switches are extremely rare, and you probably won’t find them listed on the Cherry MX webpage. These switches are similar to the Cherry MX Green switches and make a moderately loud sound. If you like the auditory feedback of clicky switches but want to dial it down a notch, the Cherry MX Whites are a perfect option, granted that you can source them

Moreover, they boast the same specs as their blue and green counterparts but offer comparatively quieter feedback sound.

Linear Cherry Switches

Linear Cherry MX switches are arguably the most popular switch type, especially with gamers. They offer a smooth feel and consistent keystrokes, perfect for button smashing. In fact, linear Cherry MX switches are regarded as the best gaming keyboard switches owing to the even and consistent keystrokes.

Linear Cherry MX switches have a lower actuation and bottom-out force, so you may need to adjust them when you first purchase them. You might frequently bottom out the keys, but you’ll get used to the touch and feel in days.

Cherry MX Red 

Cherry MX Red switches
Cherry MX Red switches
  • Type: Linear
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 45g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 75g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX Red switches are a popular linear choice. Many gaming keyboards come equipped with them as the lighter spring force allows for lightning-fast reaction times, perfect for gaming. However, they’re not good for people who use considerable force while typing because of the reduced bottom-out force. 

Cherry MX Black 

Cherry MX black switches
Cherry MX black switches
  • Type: Linear
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 60g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 85g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX Black is a perfect choice for our lead-fingered readers who prefer switches with a heavier keystroke, with its stiffer spring coil and higher actuation force. Otherwise, they’re identical to the Cherry MX Red switches in the sound and feel department, offering a buttery smooth experience and quiet feedback. 

They’re perfect for gaming and button smashing, offering a 15g force difference compared to the MX Reds, with a 60g actuation force and 85g bottom-out force. Additionally, the original build of the Cherry MX Blacks, popularly dubbed the vintage MX Black, is popular to this date and offers a far smoother feel compared to the current designs.

Tactile Cherry MX Switches

Tactile Cherry MX switches lie in the middle of the spectrum, with the clicky and linear switches forming the extreme ends. These provide bumpy tactile feedback, alerting you that the keystroke has been registered. Some programmers and master typists prefer tactile switches since they provide good feedback and moderate noise. 

If you want a smooth typing experience without bottoming out your keys, the tactile Cherry MX switches are an excellent option for your mechanical keyboard. They’re also similar sounding switches for people transitioning from non-mechanical keyboards.

Cherry MX Brown 

Cherry MX brown switches
Cherry MX brown switches
  • Type: Tactile
  • Feel/Sound: Bumpy, Moderately Loud
  • Actuation Force: 55g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 60g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

You might have come across the Cherry MX Brown switches online or in your local computer and hardware store. The MX Browns are the most commonly available Cherry MX switches in the market and are decent for gamers and typists. 

They have a lower actuation force compared to the MX Red and Blacks. However, they do produce a moderately loud sound on every keystroke. In addition, they also provide bumpy tactile feedback if you want to avoid bottoming out your switches. 

If you work in a loud office space where a quiet switch layout will numb your brain or zone you out, the MX Browns are a decent choice and provide adequate feedback, with an audible bump, on every keystroke.

Cherry MX Clear 

Cherry MX Clear switches
Cherry MX Clear switches
  • Type: Tactile
  • Feel/Sound: Bumpy, Moderately Loud
  • Actuation Force: 65g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 95g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

Many people prefer the Cherry MX Clear switches because they provide a heavier feel than the MX Browns. They have an actuation force of 65g and a bottom-out force of 95g to help prevent typists from bottoming their keys out. 

On the flipside, typists with a lighter keystroke might want to steer clear of the MX Clears (pun intended) because they might fatigue your fingers. However, they’re extremely comfortable for those with lead fingers.

Cherry MX Grey 

Cherry MX grey switches
Cherry MX grey switches
  • Type: Tactile
  • Feel/Sound: Bumpy, Moderately Loud
  • Actuation Force: 80g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 120g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX Grey is the powerhouse of tactile switches. It’s considerably heavier than the MX Browns and Clears. With a staggering 80g actuation force and 120g bottom-out force, these Cherry MX switches will make you feel like you’re hitting a wall of breaks. 

Moreover, they provide a loud bump but a quieter sound for feedback. Both features work in sync to limit loud noises since you’ll be using a bit of force while typing. Many people don’t prefer these, particularly gamers, as the greater actuation and bottom-out forces make for heavier and more intense keystrokes.

Cherry MC Specialty Switches

We mentioned that Cherry is one of many prominent key switch manufacturers that produce specialty designs. For those interested in the finer things in life, here’s a list of the good stuff.

Silent Switches

The Cherry MX Silent series is the bedrock of quiet switches. They have some of the quietest Cherry MX switches, perfect for those wanting some peace and quiet. Silent switches are modded with rubber dampeners near the stem, limiting the sound by providing cushion support when the switch bottoms out and springs back up. The Cherry MX Silent switches boast a staggering 30% sound reduction compared to their standard MX counterparts.

Cherry MX Silent Red 

Cherry MX Silent Red switches
Cherry MX Silent Red switches
  • Type: Linear
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Extra Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 45g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 75g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The MX Silent Red is a linear design mode providing the same smooth experience as the MX Reds. It provides extra quiet feedback to users. The Silent MX Reds are lighter and more responsive than their Silent Black counterparts. 

Cherry MX Silent Black 

Cherry MX Silent Black switches
Cherry MX Silent Black switches
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 60g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 85g
  • Actuation Distance: 2mm
  • Travel Distance: 4mm

The Cherry MX Silent Black switches are also linear in design. They have an actuation force of 60g and a bottom-out force of 85g, which makes them heavier than the Silent Reds. However, both options are excellent if you’re looking to set up a silent workstation. They feel rubbery when you bottom out, but many people argue that the near-silent sound is a justified tradeoff.

Speed Switches: Fast and Precise

Staying true to the speed switch design, the Cherry MX Speeds use a shorter actuation distance, providing lightning-fast responses from the keyboard. A programmer who crunches thousands of lines of code daily will love the MX Speed switches for not having to press the keys all the way down. 

Cherry MX Speed Silver 

Cherry MX Speed Silver switches
Cherry MX Speed Silver switches
  • Type: Linear
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 45g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 80g
  • Actuation Distance: 1.2mm
  • Travel Distance: 3.4mm

The Cherry MX Silver is the only available option in the Speed series but the only one required, to be frank. The switches have a total travel distance of 3.4mm, roughly 0.6mm shorter than traditional Cherry MX switches. They have a mere 1.2mm actuation distance, which is 0.8mm less than the Cherry MX Red switches. However, many gamers argue that shorter distance does not always equate to faster reaction times. 

In addition, also be wary of the short travel distance as it can cause you to bottom out the switches more often when gaming or typing.

Cherry MX Low Profile Switches

Cherry MX Low Profile switches are specifically made for low-profile keyboards, which are quite the rage. Unlike your conventional mechanical keyboards, the low-profile versions are considerably thinner and provide shorter keystrokes. 

The Cherry MX Low Profile switches further reduce actuation and travel distances. Theoretically, reducing both values should afford the user faster reflexes and a shorter reaction time.

Cherry MX Low Profile Red

Cherry MX Low Profile Red
Cherry MX Low Profile Red
  • Type: Linear
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 45g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 80g
  • Actuation Distance: 1.2mm
  • Travel Distance: 3.2mm

The MX Low Profile Reds are based on a linear design. Therefore, the switches are extremely smooth and quiet. The actuation force is roughly half the bottom-out force and provides a faster response time. Moreover, the actuation distance is 1.2mm and can drastically improve reaction times. These Cherry MX switches are a good option for gamers who rely on high sensitivity while playing competitive games like Fortnite or Call of Duty.

Cherry MX Low Profile Speed Silver 

Cherry MX Low Profile Speed switches
Cherry MX Low Profile Speed switches
  • Type: Linear
  • Feel/Sound: Smooth and Quiet
  • Actuation Force: 45g
  • Bottom-Out Force: 80g
  • Actuation Distance: 1.0mm
  • Travel Distance: 3.2mm

The Cherry MX Low Profile Speed Silver is identical to the MX Low Profile Red. However, it has an even shorter actuation distance of 1.0mm. The reduced distance should potentially further enhance response and reaction times.

Which Cherry MX Switch Should You Use?

Your choice of Cherry MX switches should be based on sound logic and not on impulsive decision-making. Consequently, it would help if you consider the following four factors when choosing mechanical keyboard switches: 

  • The Environment
  • Tactile Preference
  • Hand Size, Strength, and Typing style
  • Main Purpose of the Keyboard

Environment

The place where you’ll be using your keyboard matters greatly when it comes to your choice of key switches. For instance, office spaces are not great for using loud, auditory feedback switches, such as clicky switches.

Pay close attention to your surroundings when choosing a particular key switch type. If you live alone and want a clear indication when you press the keys, get the clicky switches, as they’ll be perfect. Get the Linear Cherry MX switches if you work in an office or are an avid gamer who wants a smooth keystroke feel with quiet feedback. 

Tactile Preference

Tactile preference is another important factor. If you like the smooth and buttery feel of linear switches, chances are you won’t like tactile or clicky switches as they provide a slight bump. Some people, like novice typists, suggest bumpy feedback is useful for improving accuracy while typing. It can help confirm every key press without the need for you to bottom out any keys. 

Similarly, gamers prefer smooth keystrokes and quiet feedback. Linear Cherry MX switches are popular for their consistent keystrokes and are adored by competitive gamers who prefer switches that don’t hinder them. As a thumb rule, you can memorize that tactile switches are often used for typing, while linear switches are used for gaming.

Hand Size, Strength, Typing Style

Hand size, strength, and typing style go hand in hand when choosing a particular switch. Pay close attention to values like actuation force and actuation point, as they help explain how much force will be required to activate the switch.

For instance, if you’re someone who uses their keyboard roughly, pounding on keys like you’re using a typewriter, you can consider buying switches with a heavier actuation force. You can even mod your key switches with O-rings to dampen the sound when the keys bottom out.

Similarly, if you have small hands and a light typing style, speed switches will be perfect. They have a short actuation distance, allowing for super-fast typing. Speed switches also give one an extra edge in gaming. They’re an excellent choice for people with a light typing style as they allow for faster keystrokes.

Main Purpose of Keyboard

The keyboard’s main purpose should guide your decision-making process. If you’re an avid gamer solely looking for gaming key switches, linear switches will be a perfect choice. The smooth and consistent keystrokes and the quiet feedback are extremely helpful during competitive gameplay.

On the other hand, if you’re only going to use your keyboard for typing, go for clicky or tactile options, as they provide auditory feedback that helps with accurate typing. If you don’t like the sound, you could go for speed switches. Even though they have a short actuation distance, it can actually help prevent you from bottoming out the keys. 

You can also buy a hot-swappable keyboard to change your Cherry MX switches as per your needs.

Top Cherry MX Alternatives

Many companies have risen to prominence as worthy alternatives to Cherry MX switches. Here’s a list of some of those heavy-hitters.

Gateron Switches

Gateron switches are perhaps the biggest rival of the Cherry MX switches. Many gamers prefer Gateron switches over the “scratchy” MX series. People have even claimed that the switches provide better feedback responses and have a consistent feeling.

Gateron’s popularity has also led it to develop the popular Zealio key switch line for the famous brand Zeal PC.

Kailh Switches 

Kailh switches rival Cherry MX switches in design and function. The company started as a mere copycat of Cherry but has drastically improved its line-up in the past decade. They even offer specialty types, such as the Kailh Speed, Kailh Box, and Kailh Low Profile switches. Their speed switches are particularly popular because of the short actuation distance and light activation force.

Razer Switches

Razer is a well-known game within the gaming community. The company has been producing gaming peripherals since 2005. In 2014, it partnered up with Kaihua and other companies to develop its own line of mechanical switches. Razer switches, particularly the Opto-Mechanical and Mecha-Membrane lines, have become popular alternatives to Cherry MX switches.

Where to Buy Cherry MX Switches?

Cherry MX switches are easily available in online marketplaces as well as local hardware stores. The website almost always has its range of switches in stock. However, it should be noted that rare models, such as the MX Whites and vintage Blacks, might not be listed on the website.

Similarly, finding these or the MX Blues can often be a hassle because their demand is extremely high within the mechanical keyboard community. 

Conclusion

Finally, this concludes our Cherry MX switch comparison. We hope you liked reading our article and found it informative. To summarize, Cherry MX switches are available in different switch types that range from clicky and tactile to linear and silent switches. The Cherry MX switches are the most popular line and include Cherry MX Red, Black, Brown, Clear, Grey, Blue, and Green switches. Cherry MX also produces specialty types like the Cherry MX Speed or Silents. 

In addition, we also covered the less popular switch types like optical and quiet switches. The portion explaining the different terms and components of mechanical switches was aimed to make the article easily understandable for beginners and people who have not yet developed a liking for mechanical keyboards.

In conclusion, Cherry MX switches are an excellent option for gamers and typists because of their great line-up of robust switches. Their products come rated at 100 million keystrokes and RGB options, so your keyboard has the benefits of a longer lifespan and a stylish look!

FAQs

Q. How long do Cherry switches last?

Cherry MX switches are usually rated at 100 million keystrokes.

Q. Are Cherry MX Brown switches good for gaming?

Cherry MX Brown switches have tactile feedback, considered a distraction in competitive gaming.

Q. Are Cherry MX Red switches loud?

Cherry MX Reds are linear switches, so they’re not loud like their tactile and clicky counterparts. They provide a smooth and consistent feel with quiet feedback.

Q. What are the best Cherry MX switches for gaming?

Cherry MX Red and Blacks are considered the gold standard in gaming, although there are specialty types like the MX Speeds.

Q. What are the best Cherry MX switches?

Cherry MX switches are based on different switch types. While the Cherry MX Blue switch is considered one of the best choices for typing, the MX Reds are considered the gold standard of gaming key switches.

Q. What are the quietest Cherry MX switches?

The Cherry MX Silent Red and Black switches are the quietest Cherry switches, officially marketed as reducing noise by a staggering 30% compared to the standard MX Red and Blacks.

Q. What are the fastest Cherry MX switches?

The Cherry MX Speed switches are the fastest. They have a light actuation force and small (1.2 mm) actuation distance, which allows for lightning-fast and accurate keystrokes.

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