What Does Resin Not Stick To or Stick Well to? Complete List in 2024

  • Resin Art 101
  • Posted by: carson-rutz
  • Mar 26, 2024

Resin is a versatile material commonly used in crafts and DIY projects. However, one common frustration when working with resin is when it doesn't stick to certain surfaces. So, what does resin not stick to? In this article, we'll explore the surfaces and materials that resin does not adhere to, helping you achieve better results in your resin projects.

List of things Epoxy Resin does NOT stick to 

Details Reason
Oil or wax-treated Surfaces Oily and greasy coating forms a barrier that hinders the resin
Dusty or dirty surfaces The particles prevent proper adhesion
Most plastics Chemically different materials do not bond well with one another
Certain metals
  • Smooth and non-porous nature
  • The presence of a natural oxide layer
Silicone Naturally resistant to sticking
Asphalt Contains oil
Certain Types of Fabrics The smooth and non-porous surface created by these treatments prevents the resin from being absorbed into the fabric fibers
Painter’s Tape and Sheathing Tape Are specifically created for easy removal without damaging the surface
Parchment, Wax, and Freezer Paper Contains substances like wax or silicone preventing it from stick to plastic
Rubber Natural resistance to adhesion
Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) A slick surface acts as a release agent
Acrylic Plastic Resin and acrylic plastic are two different materials that do not chemically bond effectively
Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) Prone to contamination by substances like dust and oils
ABS Plastic Low adhesion properties
Polycarbonate (Most Plastic Containers) Smooth and non-porous surface
Plastic Bags Low surface energy, creating challenges in forming a bond
Polyethylene (Hot Glue)
  • Smooth and not very absorbent
  • Release gases during the curing process, leading to bubbles forming in the resin and potentially reducing the strength of the bond
Silicone Sealant Caulk Non-stick properties
Plexiglass
  • Doesn't have a rough surface for the resin to grip onto
  • Often coated with a release agent during production to prevent sticking

20+ Things Resin Does Not Stick To

Resin can adhere to many surfaces, but there are some it simply won't stick to. Let's uncover what those surfaces are.

  1. Oil or Wax-treated Surfaces
Oil or Wax-treated surfaces (Source: Otarsar)
Oil or Wax-treated surfaces (Source: Otarsar)

Resin is unable to stick to oil or wax-treated surfaces because these substances form a barrier that hinders the resin from effectively attaching. To get resin to attach to these surfaces, you must first remove any oil or wax using sandpaper or a deglosser. 

  1. Powder-coated Surfaces
Powder-coated items (Source: Made-in-China)
Powder-coated items (Source: Made-in-China)

Powder-coated surfaces, commonly seen on outdoor furniture, provide a smooth finish that prevents resin from seeping in and forming a strong bond, leading to peeling or cracking.

  1. Dusty or Dirty Surfaces
Dusty or dirty surfaces (Source: Clean Nations)
Dusty or dirty surfaces (Source: Clean Nations)

Resin won't stick to dusty or dirty surfaces because the particles prevent proper adhesion. To ensure resin sticks, surfaces must be clean, dry, and free of any debris. Wiping with rubbing alcohol or using a tack cloth can help remove dust and improve adhesion.

  1. Pure Metals
What does resin not stick to metal? (Source: Crystalalloys)
What does resin not stick to metal? (Source: Crystalalloys)

Does resin stick to metal? Resin struggles to adhere to pure metals due to their smooth and non-porous nature, offering minimal surface area for attachment. Additionally, the presence of a natural oxide layer on pure metals serves as a barrier, hindering the resin from forming a strong bond with the metal surface.

One trick to getting resin to stick to pure metals is to roughen the surface with sandpaper or apply a primer specifically designed for metal surfaces.

  1. Most Plastics
Will epoxy resin stick to plastic (Source: TNHE Learning)
Will epoxy resin stick to plastic (Source: TNHE Learning)

Have you ever wondered “will epoxy resin stick to plastic?” Polyethylene, polypropylene, vinyl, and PTFE are examples of plastics that may not be compatible with resin, potentially causing peeling or cracking. These plastics are commonly utilized in situations needing chemical and UV resistance, factors that may compromise the integrity of resin bonding.

  1. Vinyl

Resin and vinyl are distinct materials with unique chemical compositions and characteristics, potentially leading to poor adhesion between them if not properly primed or treated beforehand.

  1. PTFE or Teflon
PTFE or Teflon (Source: Target Plus)
PTFE or Teflon (Source: Target Plus)

PTFE, popularly known as Teflon, is well-known for its non-reactive, nonstick, and practically frictionless surface, which prevents resin from adhering to it. This property makes it difficult to connect with resin, resulting in weak and unsustainable bonds. As a result, PTFE is widely used as a release surface in the resin casting process.

  1. Polystyrene
Polystyrene (Source: ABC)
Polystyrene (Source: ABC)

Polystyrene and resin have different properties when it comes to bonding. Polystyrene, a plastic, repels water due to being hydrophobic. On the other hand, resin, a water-based substance, needs a porous surface to bond effectively. Since polystyrene is non-porous, resin finds it challenging to penetrate and create a secure bond with it.

  1. Silicone
Silicone (Source: Linked in)
Silicone (Source: Linked in)

Silicone is naturally resistant to sticking, only adhering to itself. This quality makes it a preferred option for situations needing a flexible and non-stick surface, like using silicone molds for resin crafts.

  1. Asphalt
Asphalt (Source: Perrin Construction)
Asphalt (Source: Perrin Construction)

Since asphalt contains oil, it is not a suitable match for bonding with epoxy. The presence of oil in asphalt hinders its ability to effectively adhere to epoxy, making it an incompatible combination for various applications.

  1. Certain types of Fabrics
Fabrics with water-resistant or stain-resistant coatings (Source:Croft Mill)
Fabrics with water-resistant or stain-resistant coatings (Source:Croft Mill)

When fabrics are treated with water-resistant or stain-resistant coatings, the surface is altered, making it hard for resin to stick. As a result, resin can come off easily from these treated fabrics.

  1. Painter’s Tape and Sheathing Tape
Painter’s Tape and Sheathing Tape (Source: Istock)
Painter’s Tape and Sheathing Tape (Source: Istock)

Painter's tape and sheathing tape are specifically created for easy removal without damaging the surface. The adhesive bond these tapes provide is not strong enough to hold the weight of resin, ensuring that the tape can be effortlessly peeled off post-resin application.

  1. Parchment, Wax, and Freezer Paper
Parchment, Wax, and Freezer Paper (Source: Amazon)
Parchment, Wax, and Freezer Paper (Source: Amazon)

Parchment, wax, and freezer paper all share a common characteristic of having low surface energy, which poses a challenge for resin to adhere to them effectively. Parchment, derived from animal skin, as well as wax and freezer paper treated with substances like wax or silicone, creates a barrier between the resin and the material, hindering the formation of a strong bond.

Additionally, the slick texture of wax and certain treatments on freezer paper complicates the resin's ability to securely grip and establish a durable bond.

  1. Rubber
Rubber (Source: The Rubber Company)
Rubber (Source: The Rubber Company)

Rubber's natural resistance to adhesion makes it an attractive option for various applications, as resin does not adhere to it. This quality of rubber provides a flexible and long-lasting surface, making it a preferred choice for a wide range of uses.

  1. Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA)
Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) (Source: The European Business Review)
Polyvinyl Alcohol (PVA) (Source: The European Business Review)

Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a popular choice for preventing resin casting adhesion. Its slick surface acts as a release agent, ensuring easy removal.

  1. Acrylic Plastic
Acrylic Plastic (Source: Curbell Plastics)
Acrylic Plastic (Source: Curbell Plastics)

Resin and acrylic plastic are two different materials that do not chemically bond effectively. The smooth surface of acrylic plastic does not offer an ideal surface for resin adhesion. While a weak bond may form initially, it will not result in a durable connection. Furthermore, acrylic plastic's high surface energy makes it difficult for resins to form a firm connection with its surface.

  1. Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)
Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) (Source: ThoughtCo)
Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) (Source: ThoughtCo)

Polyvinyl chloride, commonly known as PVC, is characterized by its smooth surface that presents a challenge for resins to properly adhere to. In addition, PVC is prone to contamination by substances like dust and oils, creating a barrier that hinders resin from forming a strong bond with the material.

  1. ABS Plastic
ABS Plastic (Source: Medium)
ABS Plastic (Source: Medium)

ABS plastic, also known as Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, is popular for its low adhesion properties. Its polymers have a low surface energy, making it challenging for resin to adhere to. This makes ABS ideal for applications that require high strength. Additionally, using an epoxy resin specifically designed for ABS plastic can also help improve the bonding between the plastic and resin such as J-B Weld PlasticWeld Epoxy Adhesive, Gorilla 2-Part Epoxy, Loctite Epoxy Plastic Bonder,...

  1. Polycarbonate (Most Plastic Containers)
Polycarbonate - Most Plastic Containers (Source: Seas and Straws)
Polycarbonate - Most Plastic Containers (Source: Seas and Straws)

Polycarbonate, a plastic known for its smooth and non-porous surface, poses bonding challenges as adhesives struggle to adhere effectively. Its low surface energy further complicates adhesion, making it a tricky material for bonding with resins and other adhesives.

  1. Plastic Bags
Plastic Bags (Source: Grist)
Plastic Bags (Source: Grist)

Plastic bags are hard for resins to stick to because they are made of materials with low surface energy, creating challenges in forming a bond.

  1. Polyethylene (Hot Glue)
Polyethylene (Hot Glue) (Source: Craftkights)
Polyethylene (Hot Glue) (Source: Craftkights)

Resin and hot glue are chemically different and cured in different ways, making it challenging for resin to stick to hot glue. Hot glue, which is a thermoplastic polymer, melts and hardens as it cools, while resin is usually an epoxy-based substance that cures through a chemical process. 

Moreover, hot glue surfaces can be smooth and not very absorbent, making it tough for resin to adhere effectively. Also, hot glue can release gases during the curing process, leading to bubbles forming in the resin and potentially reducing the strength of the bond.

  1. Silicone Sealant Caulk
Silicone Sealant Caulk (Source: Popular Mechanics)
Silicone Sealant Caulk (Source: Popular Mechanics)

Silicone sealant caulk is a versatile material used for sealing and bonding, but it is not recommended for use with resins due to its non-stick properties.

  1. Plexiglass
Plexiglass (Source: Alumica)
Plexiglass (Source: Alumica)

Bonding resin with plexiglass can be tricky because plexiglass doesn't have a rough surface for the resin to grip onto. This can result in the resin sliding off or not sticking properly. Moreover, plexiglass is often coated with a release agent during production to prevent sticking, which further hinders resin adhesion. 

7 Tips for Improving Resin Adhesion

Want to make sure your resin sticks properly? Check out these simple yet effective tips for improving adhesion.

1. Clean and prepare the surface before applying resin

Clean and prep surface ensures proper adhesion and smooth finish when applying resin coating (Source: Packware)
Clean and prep surface ensures proper adhesion and smooth finish when applying resin coating (Source: Packware)

One essential tip for enhancing resin adhesion is to start by thoroughly cleaning and preparing the surface before applying the resin. Any dust, dirt, or contaminants on the surface can get trapped in the resin, leading to imperfections in the final result. Additionally, roughening smooth surfaces can enhance adhesion.

2. Use a primer or adhesion promoter 

A primer or adhesion promoter enhances surface adhesion for a better paint finish and durability (Source: Walmart)
A primer or adhesion promoter enhances surface adhesion for a better paint finish and durability (Source: Walmart)

Applying a primer made for resin can enhance its ability to stick well. These primers are made to help resin adhere better by making the surface rough, allowing the resin to grip and form a solid connection.

3. Choose the right resin for your project

Selecting the correct resin is crucial for ensuring the success and durability of your project (Source: Art Tree Creation)
Selecting the correct resin is crucial for ensuring the success and durability of your project (Source: Art Tree Creation)

Different types of resins have different properties and adhesion capabilities, so it is important to research and select the one that best suits your project requirements. If you are interested in engaging in 3D printing projects, we have curated a list of the best types of resin for 3d printing. Similarly, if you are looking to create superior wood projects, make sure to check out our articles featuring the top 15+ best epoxy resin for wood.

4. Apply the resin properly and evenly

Proper and even application of resin ensures a smooth and flawless finish every time (Source: Salvage Secret)
Proper and even application of resin ensures a smooth and flawless finish every time (Source: Salvage Secret)

Make sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully and mix the resin components thoroughly to ensure uniform consistency. When applying the resin, use a brush or a roller to spread it evenly across the surface, ensuring that all areas are coated properly. Avoid leaving any spots uncovered or applying the resin too thickly, as this can lead to uneven adhesion and curing.

5. Degrease the surfaces

Clean surfaces ensure proper adhesion; degrease before resin application for best results and durability (Source: Allrecipes)
Clean surfaces ensure proper adhesion; degrease before resin application for best results and durability (Source: Allrecipes)

*Note

  • Ensure that the surface is impeccably clean and devoid of any oil or grease. Even if the surface looks clean, degreasing should still be carried out. 
  • Prepare some abrading tools: sandblasters, wire brushes, emery cloths, or glass paper can be used
  • Bond surfaces promptly after any pretreatment process is completed.

Resin projects require a clean surface for successful adhesion. Discover how to degrease the surface of some popular materials before applying resin to achieve the best results

* Acrylic glass:

  1. Degrease the surface using a detergent solution to remove any residues.
  2. Abrade the surface with emery cloth to create a rough texture for better adhesion of the resin.
  3. Remove any dust particles using dry air or a non-clouding solvent to ensure a clean surface for the resin application.

*Concrete

  1. Use mechanical scarification or sandblasting to remove 3mm of the concrete surface where the resin will be applied. 
  2. Once the surface has been scarified or sandblasted, remove any dust particles by using a vacuum cleaner. 
  3. After degreasing the concrete, make sure the surface is completely dry before proceeding with the application of the resin. 

* Polyester Resins

Before applying the polyester resins, it is important to follow these steps to ensure proper adhesion:

  1. Degrease the surface to remove any oils or greases that could interfere with the bonding of the resin.
  2. Abrade the surface with emery cloth or steel wool to create a rough texture that will help the resin bond better.
  3. After abrading, degrease the surface again using acetone or methyl ethyl ketone to ensure that it is completely clean and free of any contaminants. 

 * Stone, Ceramics, Glass

To degrease the stone, ceramics, and glass before applying the resin, follow these steps:

  1. Degrease the surfaces with trichloroethylene to remove any oil or grease.
  2. For stone surfaces, use a wire brush or sandblast to remove any stubborn dirt or grime.
  3. After degreasing, rinse the surfaces with water to remove any leftover cleaner and debris.
  4. Thoroughly dry the surfaces before applying the resin to ensure proper adhesion.

* Thermoset Plastics (Epoxies, PVC, Polyurethane, Polyester).

To prepare the Thermoset Plastics for resin application, follow these steps:

  1. Degrease the surface using acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, or trichloroethylene to remove any oils or contaminants 
  2. Mechanically abrade the surface by sandblasting to roughen it up and create a better bonding surface for the resin.
  3. Repeat the degreasing process to ensure the surface is completely clean and ready for the resin application.

6. Sand smooth non-porous surfaces

Sand smooth non-porous surfaces to ensure proper adhesion and a flawless finish on projects (Source: Fluid Painting)
Sand smooth non-porous surfaces to ensure proper adhesion and a flawless finish on projects (Source: Fluid Painting)

Before applying epoxy, it is essential to prepare non-porous surfaces properly by sanding them smooth. Utilizing 80-grit aluminum oxide paper will create the ideal texture for the epoxy to adhere to. 

Ensure that the surface is stable and free of any imperfections like flaking, chalking, or blistering, as well as any old coatings before proceeding with sanding. After sanding, it is crucial to thoroughly remove all dust post-sanding to achieve optimal bonding results.

If you want to master the art of sanding epoxy resin in a more detailed way, our detailed guide will break down the process into easy-to-follow steps for you!

7. Ensure proper curing time and conditions

Proper curing is vital for resin bonding to surfaces effectively; follow time and conditions precisely (Source: Intoresin)
Proper curing is vital for resin bonding to surfaces effectively; follow time and conditions precisely (Source: Intoresin)
  • Allow the resin to cure fully. So, how long does resin take to cure? Read our post to determine the curing time of each different type of resin.
  • Curing conditions, like temperature and humidity, can affect the final outcome, so ensure the workspace is well-prepared. 
  • Conduct adhesion tests to evaluate the strength of the bond. This may help discover problems early on and make required changes.
  • Consider post-treatment options, such as applying a sealant or primer, to further enhance adhesion and protect the bond.

10+ Things Resin stick well to

List of things Epoxy Resin does stick to 

Surface Category Reason
Wood Porous nature
Steel Despite its non-porous nature, readily wets when exposed to epoxy
Cast Iron Being easily affected by water when epoxy is applied due to its irregularities
Aluminum High thermal conductivity, and the ability to form an oxide layer
Fiberglass The textured surface of fiberglass provides mechanical interlocking for resin adhesion, while its porosity allows resin penetration, ensuring a strong bond.
Concrete Concrete naturally has pores that allow it to bond effectively with epoxy
Bricks The rough texture of brick provides a mechanical bond
Marble The chemical composition of marble, specifically its calcium carbonate content, can chemically bond with the epoxy resin
Stone Stones have enough porosity to form a strong bond
Shells A high level of porosity and readily absorbs epoxy
Ceramic Rough texture and porous surface
Cured/ dried Epoxy Easily bond with fresh epoxy after sanding

Resin is a versatile material that can stick to a variety of surfaces, making it a great option for various crafting and DIY projects. So, what does resin stick to? Here are some surfaces that resin easily adheres to!

  1. Wood
Wood Surface (Source: The Daily Bark)
Wood Surface (Source: The Daily Bark)

Wood surfaces are ideal for epoxy application such as creating stunning epoxy countertops, river tables, artistic furniture, and decorative wall art pieces due to their porous nature, allowing the liquid epoxy to seep in and create a strong bond. The resin adds durability and a glossy finish to the wood surface.

  1. Steel
Steel (Source: PGI Steel)
Steel (Source: PGI Steel)

Steel, despite its non-porous nature, readily wets when exposed to epoxy, leading to a robust mechanical bond for industrial flooring, automotive body panels, and furniture manufacturing. While the bond may not be as strong as with porous materials, the epoxy's ability to penetrate pores should suffice for most applications.

  1. Cast Iron
Cast Iron (Source: Reliance Foundry)
Cast Iron (Source: Reliance Foundry)

Cast iron is prone to being easily affected by water when epoxy is applied due to its irregularities. Before using epoxy on cast iron, it is important to thoroughly remove any grease or oils present on the surface. One effective method is to wash the cast iron with hot water to ensure that it is completely free from any oils before applying the epoxy.

  1. Aluminum
Aluminum (Source: IndiaMart)
Aluminum (Source: IndiaMart)

Aluminum's smooth surface, high thermal conductivity, and ability to form an oxide layer make it suitable for resin adhesion. Most aluminum and its alloys adhere well to epoxy in applications such as coating and sealing to protect and enhance the appearance of the metal, as well as in manufacturing processes for creating durable and corrosion-resistant products. It is recommended to sand down aluminum surfaces as they are not naturally porous.

  1. Fiberglass
Fiberglass (Source: C&En)
Fiberglass (Source: C&En)

The textured surface of fiberglass provides mechanical interlocking for resin adhesion, while its porosity allows resin penetration, ensuring a strong bond. When fiberglass is properly sanded and prepped, it provides a suitable surface for epoxy to adhere to effectively repair breaks, and recreate or join surfaces. It's important to ensure that any oily residues are thoroughly removed from the surface before sanding, as this can result in a less secure bond when the epoxy is applied.

  1. Concrete
Concrete (Source: Wikipedia)
Concrete (Source: Wikipedia)

Concrete naturally has pores that allow it to bond effectively with epoxy in the form of coatings, repair materials, paints, adhesives, epoxy mortars, grouts, bonding agents, sealers, and penetrating sealers. To enhance this bond, sanding the concrete surface creates more surface area for the epoxy to adhere to.

  1. Bricks
Bricks (Source: Wall Need Loves)
Bricks (Source: Wall Need Loves)

The rough texture of brick provides a mechanical bond for the epoxy resin to grip onto, enhancing the overall adhesion between the two materials. But it's important to clear any loose debris on the brick surface that might hinder the strength of the bond. Epoxy is great for sealing brick cracks due to its water-resistant properties. It can effectively bond and seal, even in rainy conditions.

  1. Marble
Marble (Source: Luxury Tiles UK)
Marble (Source: Luxury Tiles UK)

The chemical composition of marble, specifically its calcium carbonate content, can chemically bond with the epoxy resin to create a solid and bonded structure that will not easily break or chip, especially when the surface of the marble is rough and not properly smooth.

  1. Stone
Stone (Source: Stone Mart)
Stone (Source: Stone Mart)

Many stones have enough porosity to form a strong bond with epoxy resin. It is important to thoroughly clean the stone surface to eliminate loose debris and imperfections that could hinder the bonding process.

  1. Shells
Shells (Source: Happily Ever Letter)
Shells (Source: Happily Ever Letter)

When shells are utilized in epoxy projects, they demonstrate a high level of porosity and readily absorb epoxy, leading to the formation of a durable bond. Resin is commonly used on shell surfaces for waterproofing, protecting against UV damage, enhancing durability, and adding a glossy finish.

  1. Ceramic
Ceramic (Source: Laird Plastics)
Ceramic (Source: Laird Plastics)

Ceramic's rough texture and porous surface make it suitable for resin adherence, however, they end up with a well-polished finish. For ceramic pieces to adhere to epoxy, polishing finishes need to be roughened up with sanding. This process increases surface area and decreases surface tension, allowing the epoxy to properly adhere to a strong bond.

  1. Cured/dried Epoxy
Cured/dried  Epoxy (Source: The Epoxy Resin Store)
Cured/dried  Epoxy (Source: The Epoxy Resin Store)

Once the epoxy has fully cured, it becomes rigid, but after thorough sanding, it can easily bond with fresh epoxy. Sanding the cured epoxy ensures a smooth and seamless connection with new layers. However, it's important to note that the success of the bond can also depend on the specific types and brands of epoxy and resin being used. It's always a good idea to test the compatibility and adhesion between the two materials in a small, inconspicuous area before proceeding with a larger project.

6 Tips to stop Resin from sticking to the molds

Resin sticking to molds is a common issue, but with these handy tips, you can prevent it from happening again.

1. Use a mold release agent

A mold release agent prevents resin adhesion to molds, facilitating easy removal after curing (Source: Supervac Industries LLC)
A mold release agent prevents resin adhesion to molds, facilitating easy removal after curing (Source: Supervac Industries LLC)

Using a mold release agent can help create a barrier between the resin and the mold, making it easier to remove the cured resin once it has set. So if unfortunately, your resin is sticky and difficult to get out of the mold, how to fix sticky resin and help it quickly cure? Check out these effective tips for dealing with sticky resin and creating beautiful resin art.

2. Check the temperature of your resin

If your resin is too hot, it may end up sticking to the mold. When resin exceeds this temperature range, it can warp or deform, leading to sticking issues. To prevent this, always check the temperature of your resin using a digital thermometer. The recommended temperature range for resin is 70 - 80 degrees Fahrenheit.

Related Articles

3. Wait until the resin is fully cured

To prevent resin from sticking, ensure molds are fully cured before removing resin (Source: Apel USA)
To prevent resin from sticking, ensure molds are fully cured before removing resin (Source: Apel USA)

It is crucial to wait until the resin is fully cured before attempting to de-mold the object. Trying to remove the resin too soon can cause it to stick to the mold and deform the shape of the product. For example, we have to wait 48 - 72 hours for the epoxy resin to cure, while it just needs 30 minutes - 2 hours for UV resin. So, how long does resin take to cure? We have compiled a list of the most resin for your reference when needed. 

4. Use the right kind of mold

Choose the correct mold type to prevent resin adhesion, ensuring easy removal and successful casting (Source: Caft Resin)
Choose the correct mold type to prevent resin adhesion, ensuring easy removal and successful casting (Source: Caft Resin)

When using molds for resin casting, it's important to ensure they are free of any uncured silicone spots. These spots can cause the resin to stick and tear when removing it from the mold, especially with tin-cure silicone molds. To prevent this issue, you should use molds that are free from any uncured silicone residues. In addition, different types of resin have their applications, so you should research them before molding them to achieve the best results.

5. Make sure the mold is completely cleaned and dry

Any residue or moisture left in the mold can cause the resin to not set properly and stick to the mold. It is important to thoroughly clean and dry your molds before each use to avoid any potential issues.

6. Mix the resin thoroughly and evenly 

Thoroughly mix resin to prevent sticking to molds and ensure even distribution for best results (Source: Eti)
Thoroughly mix resin to prevent sticking to molds and ensure even distribution for best results (Source: Eti)

When resin is not mixed properly, it can lead to uneven curing and the formation of air bubbles, both of which can cause the resin to stick to the mold. To ensure a flawless finish when working with epoxy resin, it’s essential to mix your resin and hardener precisely. Start by gathering the right tools and setting up your workspace in an area that’s clean and free of dust.

The mixing ratio is critical and varies by product; it could be 2:1, 3:1, or even 5:1. Read our article about how to mix resin and hardener to know more details about the right mixing process.

Conclusion

In conclusion, what does resin not stick to? We have already compiled a list of the 20+ common surfaces that are unsuitable for resin adhesion. By keeping them in mind, you can avoid frustrating mishaps and ensure successful projects.

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